Does Wearing a Corset Prevent Back Injuries?

By Western Berks on February 8th, 2016

 

Does Wearing a Corset Prevent Back Injuries? - Western Berks Physical Therapy

 

While back pain for some people is no more than a nuisance, statistics show that 50–80% of American adults will be disabled by back pain—some more severely than others—at some point during their lives. Corsets and braces, available without a prescription and generally obtained by individuals on their own or from employers, have been popular as a treatment for back and neck pain.

At the onset of acute back pain, a corset can be useful when worn for a short period of time to relieve stress on the spine and to help you avoid potentially injurious bends and twists. However, they do not appear to help relieve pain and, when used extensively, are not helpful in preventing spine injury.

Today, the true key to help prevent back injuries is strengthening the back through

 

  • specific exercises,
  • being physically active and
  • using proper body mechanics in your daily activities.

 

The body mechanics component begins with learning the all-important neutral spine position. Knowing how to bend and how to lift objects properly is crucial because doing so incorrectly is a prime cause of back injuries. The spine consists of 3 parts, each with a natural curve: cervical (neck), thoracic (middle) and lumbar (low). We can help you recognize how to stand, sit and walk to best maintain these curves in their proper neutral alignment, or to correct over-curvatures that may have developed over time.

A supervised exercise program designed for you might include stretching, muscle strengthening, back stabilization and flexing. Your plan would probably also include exercises designed to build aerobic capacity and endurance; improving your overall fitness makes you less susceptible to back and other injuries.

Finally, Western Berks Physical Therapy , a leading provider of Physical Therapy in Reading PA area, can work with you to strengthen your abdominal muscles. Though they are found in the front region of your body rather than the back, they are critically important to supporting your spine.